Relevant Past Experience

8:00 AM. Time to log in to the system and get to work. As soon as the system acknowledges me, both screens suddenly go blank. A tiny light shows up on the left hand corner of one screen, pulsing as if to say “I am here, you just cannot get through to me”.  Before I could finish my thought on that little light (that ominously reminded me of a life-support monitor), my phone line rings as if on cue and just like that I was laid off. That was 4 years and near 1000 job applications (give or take a few) ago.  No fault or blame on me (or the multitude of others like myself that day), just your regular run-of-the-mill re-org. As if the reason would somehow make our lives quake less. It doesn’t.  The aftershocks are identical no matter how well gift-wrapped the reason.  So yeah the sudden quake sucked, as did I.  Sucked it up and moved forward that is. Interviews? You ask. Check. Networking? Check. Additional Training and Certifications?  Volunteering?  Work for free to get the word out? Check! Check! and Check! The result? Nada. The reason? “Relevant Past Experience” (or lack thereof) 1,460+ days of finding out that my professional past was the yardstick I was going to be measured by, for the rest of my professional life.  No amount of explaining that my resume only listed what I had done, not what I was good at, was enough to convince someone to hire me.  Neither were testimonials, results or sustained, solid and tangible proof of my strong suits. The resume won every time....

Atlas Falls

A new country. A refugee. An architect. An engineer. A builder. A real estate businessman. A 50 year career. A trail blazer. He was all of those things and more, but to me he was simply ‘Papa’. And to me, my father was Atlas. Period.   Fortunately when they were handing out fathers in heaven I ended up with the winning lottery ticket. He was love incarnate. Firm yet fair. Soft yet sage. But who he was on this earth is not the point of this blog. It cannot be. There isn’t enough time, space or language that would suffice. The point is the value of everything we have in our parents.   Not only do we have in them, the masons of our very existence, at any given time we have a friend, a confidant, a philosopher, a guide, a counselor, a chauffeur, a lawyer, a financial planner and more. On demand and free. We couldn’t afford to pay for it anyway. More importantly, there is not enough wealth in this world to secure their presence with us. They leave. They have to. And their time with us is finite.   I had my father for 51 years on this earth and we spoke everyday, sometimes more than once – seven oceans and several continents were no match for us. Yet the daughter in me wishes she had more. More time. More papa. It doesn’t even have to be on demand or free. But it doesn’t work that way. I cannot call or write or visit him on demand and no amount of money can change that. So...

3 questions with … Toniya Singh, who wowed TEDx crowd

Dayton Daily News – Talking to Toniya Singh, it’s easy to feel she has packed three or four lifetimes into the space of one. Daughter of a film star mother and engineer father in India. Honors student. Fluent in five languages. Immigrant. Professional coach… go to Dayton Daily News to read complete article                           Know someone who can handle Three Questions? We’re looking for behind-the-scenes-but-still fascinating Miami Valley residents with something to say. Send your suggestions...